Tuesday, 8 November 2011

Free Knitting Pattern for a Knitted Carrot


                 
My aim for Christmas is to post 10 free patterns for quick knits - mainly ideas for christmas pressies and wrappings, so without further ado, here is my first free pattern for a knitted carrot. 

How many of you leave carrots out for Rudolph? Well, here's a pattern for a fab lifesize carrot that you can pop on a saucer and leave out for Rudolph and his reindeer pals.

How do I knit a carrot?

The carrot is knitted flat, starting at the top of the carrot and knitting towards the tip of the carrot. 

You will increase to create the wider section at the top, then decrease towards the tip.

Then the side seam is sewn and the carrot is stuffed whilst you sew. 


How do I increase my knitting stitches?

Increasing is made by picking up the strand of yarn that is lying between the two needles (inserting left-hand needle from front to back), then you knit into the back of this stitch to twist the stitch and avoid making a hole in your knitting

This forms a neat, almost invisible increase and so is great for increasing in the middle of the row. 

I tried using kfb (knitting into the front and back of the stitch) but this left an unsightly small hole, which I wasn't happy with and I think you can see the holes, even in the photo. 

Here's a good link for increasing if you need it http://www.learn2knit.co.uk/knitting/increasing.php.


Abbreviations:

  • k: knit
  • p: purl
  • m1: make 1 increase by by picking up the horizontal strand of yarn that lies between the two stitches on the needles and knitting into the back of it (this twists the stitch and prevents a hole).
  • stocking stitch: one row knit, one row purl, repeated as many times as stated.
  • k2tog: knit the next two stitches together as one stitch to decrease 1 stitch.
  • p2tog: purl the next two stitches together as one stitch to decrease 1 stitch.


You Will Need: 

  • Double knitting (light worsted weight yarn): oddments of orange and oddments of green
  • 2.75mm straight needles
  • 2 x 2.75mm double-pointed needles (for tip of carrot)
  • Toy filling
  • Wool needle

How to Knit a Carrot: 

Cast on 7 sts using 2.75mm straight needles and orange yarn.

Row 1: Purl all sts
Row 2: [K1, m1] to the last st, k1. (13 sts).
Rows 3-5: Starting with a p row, stocking stitch 3 rows.
Row 6: [k2, m1] to the last st, k1. (19 sts).
Rows 7-11: Starting with a p row, stocking stitch 5 rows.
Row 12: [K3, m1] to the last stitch, k1. (25 sts).
Rows 13-17: Starting with a p row, stocking stitch 5 rows.
Row 18: [K2, k2tog] to the last st, k1. (19 sts).
Rows 19-25: Starting with a p row, stocking stitch 7 rows.
Row 26: [K1, k2tog] to the last st, k1. (13 sts).
Rows 27-33: Starting with a p row, stocking stitch 7 rows.
Row 34: [K1, k2tog] to the last st, k1. (9 sts).
Rows 35-39: Starting with a p row, stocking stitch 5 rows.
Row 40: K2, k2tog] twice, k1. (7 sts).
Rows 41-45: Starting with a p row, stocking stitch 5 rows.
Row 46: [K1, k2tog] twice, k1. (5 sts).
Row 47: P2tog, p3tog. (2 sts).

Change to double pointed needles and work an I-cord for 3 or 4 rows on remaining 2 sts then k2tog (1 st remaining). Cut yarn and pull yarn through last st. Pull tight to fasten off. Starting from the bottom, use mattress stitch to close the side seam, filling with toy filling as you sew, leaving the cast on sts open. Use your knitting needle to poke the toy filling into the point of the carrot.

Stalks: 

Using 2.75mm needles and green yarn, cast on 18 or 20 sts. Cast off. Make three in total of varying lengths (I made two with 18 sts and one with 20 sts). Stitch the three stalks together for approximately 1cm, then stitch to the top of the carrot inside the cast on edge. 

Good luck - email me if you see any errors and I'll add the pattern on ravelry. My user ID is Lynne Rowe if you want to post a picture. I can't wait to see your Rudolph carrots.

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3 comments:

  1. These look good enough to eat!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks so much for this pattern, it is exactly what I needed

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like the green stems; they look truer to life than the other ones I've seen on Ravelry. I-cord would be great for that, too! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete